South Dakota
The Argus Leader compiled the number of same-sex marriage performed in South Dakota in the two years after marriage equality became the law:

So two years after the state changed to allow same-sex marriage, Rosenbrahn savors the wedding invites. This year, they fall on dates through the summer and through the fall. The state has sold 283 marriage licenses to same-sex couples since the law changed in June of 2015.

Sioux Falls Pride was recently held at Terrace Park, the Argus Leader reports:

Rainbows will no doubt fill Terrace Park on Saturday for Sioux Falls Pride, but yellow already dominates the event’s marketing material.
That’s because yellow symbolizes hope, said Ashley Joubert-Gaddis, a volunteer for Sioux Falls’ Center for Equality.
“Especially in this political climate we cannot lose that hope,” Joubert-Gaddis said.
It’s a feeling organizers want to inspire in the LGBT community in light of the election of President Donald Trump and actions taken so far by his administration, she said. National politics has captured the attention of her group and others in the community, a year after South Dakota’s own political scene was the source of much apprehension and action.
Related: Two years in, same-sex marriages in S.D. number in the hundreds
Pride in the Park is scheduled to run 12-6 p.m. Saturday at Terrace Park, 1100 West 4th Street. A pre-party kicks off 10 p.m. Friday at the ICON Lounge in downtown Sioux Falls, with the local group Sister scheduled to perform Prince songs.
Sioux Falls Pride draws as many as 8,000 people each year. Saturday’s festival includes activities for children and adults, including a Zoo Express hosted by the Great Plains Zoo, a magician, drag shows and live music.

Last week, California announced a prohibition on state-funded travel to four states that discriminate against LGBTQ people, including South Dakota, KSFY reports:

California’s attorney general announced Thursday that California will prohibit state-funded and state-sponsored travel to South Dakota and three other states based on discriminatory legislation enacted in each state.
The other states added to California’s travel restrictions list include Alabama, Kentucky, and Texas.
“Our country has made great strides in dismantling prejudicial laws that have deprived too many of our fellow Americans of their precious rights. Sadly, that is not the case in all parts of our nation, even in the 21st century. I am announcing today that I am adding four states to the list of states where California-funded or sponsored travel will be restricted on account of the discriminatory nature of laws enacted by those states,” said Attorney General Xavier Becerra. “While the California DOJ works to protect the rights of all our people, discriminatory laws in any part of our country send all of us several steps back. That’s why when California said we would not tolerate discrimination against LGBTQ members of our community, we meant it.”
In March, South Dakota enacted a law that could prevent qualified LGBT couples from adopting or serving as foster parents.
California’s AB 1887 prohibits state-funded and state-sponsored travel to states with laws that authorize or require discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression or against same-sex couples or their families. The California legislation went into effect on January 1, 2017. This restriction applies to state agencies, departments, boards, authorities, and commissions, including an agency, department, board, authority, or commission of the University of California, the Board of Regents of the University of California, and the California State University.

Gov. Daugaard lashed out against California’s decision, KSFY reports:

Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard is responding to a move by California to prohibit state-funded travel to South Dakota following passage of SB 149.
“These government ‘travel bans’ are political statements that have no discernible effect,” Daugaard said Friday. “They are designed to generate publicity.”
California’s attorney general made the announcement Thursday that California will prohibit state-funded and state-sponsored travel to South Dakota and three other states based on discriminatory legislation enacted in each state.
The other states added to California’s travel restrictions list include Alabama, Kentucky, and Texas.
“Our country has made great strides in dismantling prejudicial laws that have deprived too many of our fellow Americans of their precious rights. Sadly, that is not the case in all parts of our nation, even in the 21st century. I am announcing today that I am adding four states to the list of states where California-funded or sponsored travel will be restricted on account of the discriminatory nature of laws enacted by those states,” said Attorney General Xavier Becerra. “While the California DOJ works to protect the rights of all our people, discriminatory laws in any part of our country send all of us several steps back. That’s why when California said we would not tolerate discrimination against LGBTQ members of our community, we meant it.”

Wisconsin

Racine held its ninth annual Pride, the Journal Times reports:

Racine’s ninth annual LGBTQ Rights Parade and Rally drew approximately 70 people.
LGBTQ stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and q can stand for either questioning or queer.
Lori Peterson, a nurse from Mount Pleasant, attended with a sign reading: “Straight but not narrow.” She was part of the group that marched from the Racine County Courthouse to Monument Square for a rally there.
“I think we all have the right to be who we want to be,” said Peterson, 53, who was attending the event for the second time. “I thought it was something worth standing up for.”
Rae Antczak, 17, an at-home student of Wisconsin Virtual Academy, identifies as a transgender male.
“It has been really hard for me,” Antczak said. “Not everyone has been accepting.

WSAU reports that the Wausau school board is considering a policy that requires parents be informed before their transgender child uses the bathroom:

Parental consent could become a required step for transgender students using different bathroom facilities in the Wausau School District after a School Board committee meeting last night.
That was one of the few changes suggested to the guidelines that have been in place since last fall for principals and faculty. The Department of Civil Rights encouraged schools to adopt guidelines like these last fall, and Wausau School Board President Lance Trollop says they’ve seen what can happen to schools that have not.
Trollop said, “I’m aware of only one school district in Wisconsin that has denied a transgender student’s request to use a bathroom that is inconsistent with their gender identity assigned at birth, the Kenosha School District. They were sued and, thus far, that lawsuit has been going very poorly for them.”

Manitoba
Parents have filed complaints against Manitoba’s public schools for discrimination against LGBTQ students and families, the CBC reports:

Manitoba’s public schools get a failing grade when it comes to reflecting the diversity of families, which leads to discrimination against LGBT families and their kids, complaints filed with the Manitoba Human Rights commission allege.
Two Manitoba families have accused the province of allowing discrimination against LGBT individuals and their families by not providing adequate inclusive learning materials in the classroom.
This means children don’t see themselves and their families reflected in their lessons at school, the complaints say.
Same-sex couple files human rights complaint against Hanover School Division
Canadian schools want to support LGBT youth, study says
Provincial guidelines that designate issues of gender identity and sexuality as sensitive topics compound the problem by limiting them to discussions around sexual education and health, allowing parents to opt out of having their children take part in those discussions, they say.
“What we’re talking about is not so much people’s sexuality, or specifically their gender identity, but actually just about family diversity and understanding and accepting everyone,” said Allison Fenske, a lawyer with the Public Interest Law Centre who is representing the complainants.
“And so students have to be able to see themselves and their families reflected in their school and know that their families matter.”

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Andy Birkey

Andy Birkey has written for a number of Minnesota and national publications. He founded Eleventh Avenue South which ran from 2002-2011, wrote for the Minnesota Independent from 2006-2011, the American Independent from 2010-2013. His writing has appeared in The Advocate, The Star Tribune, The Huffington Post, Salon, Cagle News Service, Twin Cities Daily Planet, TheUptake, Vita.mn and much more. His writing on LGBT issues, the religious right and social justice has won awards including Best Beat Reporting by the Online News Association, Best Series by the Minnesota chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, and an honorable mention by the Sex-Positive Journalism awards.

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